Posted by: Erica Geary | May 14, 2012

Meet The Medea

Allow me to introduce you to the often overlooked, yet impressive Medea.

The steam yacht Medea is one of three remaining Edwardian yachts in existence today.

She was built in Scotland in 1904 as a private yacht for William Macalister Hall.  His family used her for hunting trips to remote islands and to take friends on excursions.

William Macalister Hall

During her lifetime, Medea changed ownership multiple times and was sold to the French Navy in 1917 to be used for anti-submarine patrol.  Her name was briefly changed to Corneille during her service in WWI.  Later she was sold back into private ownership.

In WWII Medea served in both the British Royal Navy and the Norwegian Navy before being sold again.  She became a floating art gallery in 1969.  Her last owner, Paul Whittier, presented Medea to the Maritime Museum of San Diego in July of 1973.

Her galley had a wood-burning stove and a wooden icebox.

Medea is sleek and powerful, with her many aesthetic embellishments and double reciprocating steam engine.

She boasts luxurious sleeping cabins below the main deck and has two heads, one with a bathtub.

Today she is used as part of the museum’s exhibits and sometimes sails as a special “Thank you” to museum donors and guests.

Come take a look for yourself.  She is a gem.

Fair winds,

Erica Geary


Responses

  1. Great to see Medea in such good condition.Lots of TLC being applied ! Keep her going! Millicent Reid (Malindi of Lorne)

    • Thanks Millicent! Our team really is doing a great job of preserving her.


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